My reflections on human relations and mortality.

In life, we often need rude awakenings to realise how important people are. It’s rightly said, you only realise the true worth and value of something, when it’s gone.

This also applies to human relationships. We might sometimes overlook the fact that humans are mortals. We are born to die, and Death is unavoidable, inevitable and unstoppable. Our time on Earth is pretty much like a sand clock. The sand starts trickling down, as soon as we take our first breaths and open our eyes. Time is swiftly running out, and maybe that’s why we should try to soak it all in, and live in the moment.

I’ve come to the realisation that we’re always, subconsciously making memories . Just know that the people you’re making memories with NOW, might not always be around.

Humans are blessed with supreme intelligence and high-handedness over lower organisms, and have their throne at the top of the animal kingdom. But this boon of speech, thought, expression, emotions and capabilities comes attached with the tag of mortality.

While trying to survive in our fast-paced lives, we tend to forget how important the people in our lives are. We often tend to take them for granted, expect them to perform a stipulated set of duties for us, and always be around to meet our needs . Here’s a super quick reality check- They’re not going to be around forever .

While fostering relationships is simple, always being there for each other, and supporting each other is hard. We have to express ourselves, and always be sure to show our appreciation for our loved ones.

Don’t put it off for another day. Telling your loved ones what they mean to you, and how much you love them, is so vital. While they are around, let them know that you love them as many times as you can.

My purpose of sharing my thoughts on this subject is not to plant a ‘fear’ of the unforeseen in your minds- it’s just to let you know that it’s important to love and appreciate those you know, and hold them closer to your heart.

Life is full of unexpected hurdles and surprises and rude awakenings. You’ll sometimes not realise the value of a moment, until it becomes a memory. You’ll watch moments fade with the passage of time. You’ll forget insignificant details, but you’ll never forget the people you love.

Let your family and friends know that they’re loved. When was the last time you told them that you loved them? Pick up your phone, and speak to someone you’ve been wanting to, but have never had the time to, or rather, never tried to make the time to talk to them.

Cherish the company of the people you love. Loving and being loved is the greatest feeling in the world.

I hope you have a great, fruitful and purposeful day, surrounded by your loved ones.❤

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7 thoughts on “My reflections on human relations and mortality.”

  1. Absolutely Fantabulous Flow of Reality Shimmering in the Ocean of Words that you have so wonderfully churned together!! Love you Dhruv Beta-Always keep and stay close to this philosophy in your life……and keep writing.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Excellent reflections Dhruv !

    Always keep up your original voice and keep writing. You are a role model to not just your friends but also to us. Cheers.

    Here’s a story I like.
    —————————

    What a Mayonnaise Jar Can Teach Us About Life-

    When things in your lives seem almost too much to handle, when 24 hours in a day are not enough, remember the mayonnaise jar and the two cups of coffee.

    A professor stood before his philosophy class and had some items in front of him. When the class began, he wordlessly picked up a very large and empty mayonnaise jar and proceeded to fill it with golf balls. He then asked the students if the jar was full. They agreed that it was.

    The professor then picked up a box of pebbles and poured them into the jar. He shook the jar lightly. The pebbles rolled into the open areas between the golf balls. He then asked the students again if the jar was full. They agreed it was.

    The professor next picked up a box of sand and poured it into the jar. Of course, the sand filled up everything else. He asked once more if the jar was full. The students responded with an unanimous “yes.”

    The professor then produced two cups of coffee from under the table and poured the entire contents into the jar, effectively filling the empty space between the sand. The students laughed.

    “Now,” said the professor as the laughter subsided, “I want you to recognize that this jar represents your life. The golf balls are the important things — your family, your children, your health, your friends and your favorite passions — and if everything else was lost and only they remained, your life would still be full. The pebbles are the other things that matter like your job, your house and your car. The sand is everything else — the small stuff.

    “If you put the sand into the jar first,” he continued, “there is no room for the pebbles or the golf balls. The same goes for life. If you spend all your time and energy on the small stuff you will never have room for the things that are important to you.

    “Pay attention to the things that are critical to your happiness. Play with your children. Take time to get medical checkups. Take your spouse out to dinner. Play another 18. There will always be time to clean the house and fix the disposal. Take care of the golf balls first — the things that really matter. Set your priorities. The rest is just sand.”

    One of the students raised her hand and inquired what the coffee represented.

    The professor smiled. “I’m glad you asked. It just goes to show you that no matter how full your life may seem, there’s always room for a couple of cups of coffee with a friend.”

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Dhruv! Your stories really inspire me. They are full of moral values and this one , especially, highlights one of the main problems of this time- no interconnection with our loved ones.. We should really try our very best to make some time for our families. Keep it up, and all the best
    – Your brother, Daksh.

    Liked by 2 people

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